Paternity Test Case Studies

Situations where AccuPlex DNA succeeded where a lesser test failed.

 

Match 16 of 16 Markers

When the alleged father and child match at all markers the probability of paternity is calculated. This probability determines if the match is due to the man being the biological father or if he simply matches by chance. Typically, the statistics with the 16 marker test are very strong and the probability of paternity is 99.99%. In some cases, the probability is too low to be conclusive and the report is a “maybe” answer.

This happens because the shared DNA types between the alleged father and child are also DNA types that are common in the population. When you have too many common DNA types it drives the statistics down. The lower the number of markers used, the more likely it is that you can match at all the markers and be inconclusive. You can eliminate this possibility by testing more markers.

Case Example #1

 

An alleged father and child were tested at 16 markers and found to match at all 16. The statistics were too low to be conclusive and we asked for the mother’s sample to resolve the case. The mother was unavailable for testing. After testing 41 markers, the alleged father and child still matched at all the markers and the statistics were extremely high (99.99%).

Case Example #2

 

In a similar case, an alleged father and child matched at 16 of 16 markers and the statistics weren’t high enough to be conclusive. After testing 41 markers, they matched at 41 out of 41 and the statistics were extremely high (99.99%).